The CEWASTE Final Report has been published today alongside a global news release that has already enjoyed high profile coverage in the su Guardian , New Scientist and here will certainly be more to come.

 The report identifies gaps in standards and proposes an improved, fully tested certification scheme to collect, transport, process and recycle this waste, including tools to audit compliance. The report follows the 2020 EU action plan to make Europe less dependent on third countries for CRMs by, for example, diversifying supply from both primary and secondary sources while improving resource efficiency and circularity..

The H22020 project CEWASTE says the following equipment categories contain CRMs in concentrations high enough to facilitate recycling: qPrinted circuit boards from IT equipment, hard disc drives and optical disc drives qBatteries from WEEE and end of life vehicles qNeodymium iron boron magnets from hard disc drives, and electrical engines of e-bikes, scooters and end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) qFluorescent powders from cathode ray tubes (CRTs; in TVs and monitors) and fluorescent lamps qRecovery technologies and processes are well established for some CRMs, such as palladium from printed circuit boards or cobalt from lithium-ion batteries.

Recovery technologies and processes are well established for some CRMs, such as palladium from printed circuit boards or cobalt from lithium-ion batteries. For other CRMs, ongoing recycling technology development will soon make industrial scale operations possible but needs financial support and sufficient volumes to achieve cost-efficient operations. .

The overall scheme was tested at European firms in Belgium, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland,  as well as in Colombia, Rwanda and Turkey.

Treee, as a Member of  EERA (European Electronics Recyclers Association) was involved in the CEWASTE Project, actively participating in the regulatory framework and validation of the AUDT Pilot at the Rho Plant.